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20121027
20121104
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 13
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
WHUT
Oct 31, 2012 6:00pm EDT
president obama and republican presidential hopeful mitt romney debated issues of foreign policy and the economy, we turn to world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author, and mit professor noam chomsky. in a recent speech, professor chomsky examined topics largely ignored or glossed over during the campaign -- from china to the arab spring, to global warming and the nuclear threat posed by israel versus iran. he spoke last month at the university of massachusetts in amherst, at any event sponsored by the center for popular economics. his talk was entitled, "who owns the world?" >> when i was thinking about these remarks, i had two topics in mind. i could not decide between them. pretty obvious ones. one topic is, what are the most important issues that we face? the second topic is, what issues are not being treated seriously or at all in the quadrennial frenzy now under way called in election? but i realize that there is no problem. it is not a hard choice. they are the same topic. there are reasons for it, which are very significant in and of themselves. i would like to retu
WHUT
Nov 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
don't have absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayor pointed to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country that if in the absence of its wealth and its willingness to spend that wealth on engineering the seas to keep low lands occupied by dutch people, it wouldn't be a viable country. the question for the united states is because we are a coastal country with, as one of the other guests said 4 million people at least at high tide never mind back up a bit to account for three feet of higher seas in 30 or 40 years. this is not a problem that can be solved by engineering alone. not on a national scale. manhattan could solve it by engineering is alone, at least for half a century but the whole country can. the question is really from a policy perspective, f
WHUT
Oct 31, 2012 3:00am EDT
4 who is better in foreign policy? >> president obama. >> rose: right. >> what would you add to that? those are the basic kind of -- >> well there is a different variations of cares about people, who understands the middle class. i thought all along, governor romney on those questions, those character and trade questions, governor romney needed to do three things. on cares about you, understands the middle class be closer than he could have been, he couldn't lose those by large double digit margins and narrowed those. couldn't win them, had no narrow them. had plans for the economy needed a significant lead. the president has been ahead at times, kind of remarkable and three is, is favorable, unfavorable, governor romney went into the general election season based on most polls as the worst nominee of either party ever in terms of do you like this person or not? do you think of them favorably, unfavorably, he has really improved and in fact in some polling he went past the president on that measure. and that is to go back to the question of what is the one dynamic of this campai
WHUT
Nov 4, 2012 8:30am EST
environment, foreign policy. because if voters are evenly divided on their most salient issue, the economy, they're going to make their decision perhaps on some of these secondary issues. issues that they don't regard as the most important, but they might not be able to choose between governor romney and president obama on something like unemployment, so some of these other issues may matter. >> both candidates have attempted to apply moral and religious language to their economic policies. >> i think it's, frankly, not moral for my generation to keep spending massively more than we take in, knowing those burdens are going to be passed on to the next generation and they're going to be paying the interest and the principal all their lives. >> if i'm willing to give something up as somebody who's been extraordinarily blessed, and give up some of the tax breaks that i enjoy, i actually think that's going to make economic sense. but for me as a christian, it also coincides with jesus' teaching that "for unto whom much is given, much shall be required." >> but much of the god talk has b
WHUT
Oct 28, 2012 8:00am EDT
underway in a hotel in central minsk. >> i decided not to focus on international policy for more as a man. >> he is now in the role of a foreign correspondent for a newspaper his father bought for him. >> i come here as a journalist for the independent newspaper that i will write. he considers himself an authoritarian leader. >> so what does he expect from the belarussian leader? >> i don't have any expectation of how it will go. i think it's the first one that i have done where i really don't know what to expect. but apparently, according to his press secretary, he's up for a fight. >> his own father made his billions after the breakup of the soviet union and taking privatization of -- which left many in poverty. he never allowed that to happen in belarus. >> the route that your country took was very different from the one that russia took. to my mind russia went the route of plenty of democracy in the 1990's, plenty of democracy, but not very much fairness, and belarus went the opposite way. there was plenty of fairness and not very much democracy. do you think that's a fair asses
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)